Are solicitors scared of social media?

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1 July 2013


Core Legal has joined Legal Futures today as an associate member.  Core Legal is a one stop shop for suppliers who understand the legal profession. Our members provide high quality non-legal services that will support the growth and development of your law practice.

These services cover IT, software, legal cashiers, M&A advice, business consultancy and strategy, insurance, marketing and market research. As well as these specific services from individual member companies, Core Legal provides information, insights and expert analysis on issues that concern the legal profession via events, webinars, blogs, and surveys.

Our latest survey of 140 solicitors across law firms of all sizes shows that their use of social media and networking sites is still limited. Here are some key results:

A majority (56%) are on LinkedIn but no other social media tool is used by a majority.

Most solicitors on LinkedIn and other sites are mainly re-active users rather than pro-active users. In other words, they are more likely to be looking at content on these sites rather than adding content.   For example, just over a third (36%) say they add content once a week or more but over twice as many (74%) look at content once a week or more.  Another 33% only add content a few times a year.

A free copy of the full report – Use of Social Media and Networking Sites by Solicitors –  is available here.

Coming soon – a free Webinar offering  practical advice for solicitors using or thinking of using social media. If you would like to be notified when the Webinar is available please email info@corelegal.net.

 Get in touch if you have a specific service you are interested in finding out more about.



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