Social landlord implements Proclaim Case Management system

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19 July 2012


Wrekin Housing Trust is implementing Eclipse’s Proclaim Case Management software solution for its in-house legal team.

Wrekin Housing Trust is a non-profit making housing association that provides affordable housing and related services for tenants across Shropshire and Staffordshire. The trust was established in 1999 when over 13,000 homes were transferred from Telford & Wrekin Council – the country’s largest ever transfer of homes at that time.

Continuing its programme of delivering services as efficiently as possible, the trust made the decision to invest in a dedicated software solution for its legal services team. Top of the list of priorities was flexibility, with a configurable process engine to automate routine tasks and to integrate e-mail, document production and imaging, and case management.

The trust is implementing Proclaim Case Management throughout the legal services team, covering litigation, tenancy and conveyancing files. In addition, Eclipse is working closely with the team to create a number of bespoke workflow systems which will streamline the way in which files are moved through their lifecycle.

Chris Horton, company secretary at Wrekin Housing Trust, said: “Key for us was a system that was easy to use and to configure without specialised skills. Proclaim’s standing in the private practice sector stood out to us, and it will enable us to trim wasted activity out of case progression while making progress on matters transparent to client colleagues.”

 



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