SearchFlow’s new mapping solution makes lawyers’ lives easier

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27 August 2014


 

Pickford: Part of our wider promise is to make lawyers’ lives easier

SearchFlow is rolling out a new mapping solution which promises to make the search process for conveyancers easier and more efficient. Using the latest technology, the innovative new map function has been designed based on the needs of lawyers and feedback from customers.

The new map is easier to mark up and allows for greater accuracy thanks to its list of new features, including aerial views, the addition of hectares measurement, clearer graphics and extended scales for an enhanced zoom function. The enhanced mapping solution also gives users several options for pin-pointing the search area required – manually or automated – to offer greater flexibility and convenience.

“We know our customers are extremely busy and that convenience is a priority. The new mapping function is one of several steps that we’re taking to enhance the ordering experience for customers,” comments John Pickford, managing director of SearchFlow.

“Part of our wider promise to make lawyers’ lives easier, we’ve worked with our conveyancing customers to understand what they need and how we can make the search process more efficient. This bespoke mapping solution is more accurate, easier and faster to use.”

SearchFlow’s new mapping solution will be rolled out to SearchFlow customers through September, October and November.

 



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