SearchFlow launches a stamp duty calculator

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19 December 2014


SearchFlow unveil new stamp duty calculator following Autumn Statement

SearchFlow has developed a stamp duty calculator for its website to simplify the costing process for lawyers and their clients.

The requirement for this comes as a result of the Chancellor’s announcement of a new sliding scale for stamp duty during his Autumn Statement earlier this month. SearchFlow moved quickly to develop a tool, accessible via its website, which instantly works out the amount of stamp duty owed for any property transaction.

“When the Chancellor made his announcement it was clear that the changes to Stamp Duty would impact lawyers,” explains SearchFlow’s managing director, John Pickford.

“So we’ve worked quickly to produce this calculator so that the transition to the new stamp duty calculation can be as seamless as possible for those in conveyancing. Having identified a need, we wanted to create an innovative simple solution, ultimately, to make lawyers’ lives easier. This fast-paced approach to innovation is something we intend to continue as we head into 2015.”

Initially available only on SearchFlow’s website, SearchFlow has confirmed that it will be making the tool available for legal professionals to download and implement on their own websites for no charge.

For further information, please visit https://www.searchflowuk.co.uk/searches-resident/stamp-duty-calculator.



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