Search Acumen comments on the Infrastructure Act and the plan to digitise the Local Land Charges Register

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12 February 2015


Search Acumen200Andrew Lloyd, managing director of Search Acumen, comments on the Infrastructure Act becoming law today which – among a raft of measures – will:

  • allow Land Registry to create a digitised local land charges register that will improve access to data, standardise fees and improve turnaround times for property professionals and citizens
  • enable Land Registry to undertake new services that would further improve the conveyancing process or benefit the wider property sector.

“Clearly a project of this scale will present a significant challenge, but make no mistake: confirmation that these Land Registry proposals have got the green light to progress is a hugely positive development for conveyancers and property professionals.

“Ambitions to improve data access, standardise fees and achieve faster turnaround times should all be embraced. There is no doubt that the technology exists to make these aims a reality. As an industry, it is vital that we look to the future rather than cling onto existing and outdated practices whose limits will only become more exposed if progress is deferred.

“Getting Britain building again is not just about laying down bricks and mortar. We also need to make sure that other parts of the property sector have the necessary infrastructure in place to be agile and grow with demand. Realising these ambitions will take effort and commitment, but the Land Registry should be applauded for its vision and having the courage to imagine and embrace a giant leap forwards in the use of property data.”

 



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