Saunderson House recognised as an investor in people

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2 April 2015


Saunderson House200Saunderson House has been awarded the Investors in People Silver Standard, demonstrating its commitment to realising the potential of its people.

Investors in People is the UK’s leading accreditation for business improvement through people management. It provides a wealth of resources for businesses to innovate, improve and grow, with a focus on good people making great business.

Tony Overy, managing director, Saunderson House, commented: “This award recognises our focus on helping people fulfil their potential. Investors in People is widely respected and the Standard acts as an independent stamp of approval for our existing staff, prospective staff and potential clients. The Silver Standard is an accolade achieved by just 6% of Investors in People accredited organisation and we reached this in our first year of accreditation. We will continue to strive for Gold.”

Paul Devoy, head of investors in people, said: “Achieving the Investors in People Silver Standard is something that any organisation should be truly proud of. It is the sign of a company which is very committed to good people management practice and we’d like to congratulate Saunderson House on its achievement.”

Investors in People accreditation is a Standard that is based on the principle that happy and healthy workforces are the most effective, and that seeking feedback on how organisations are doing helps them to make continuous improvement to the service they provide to clients.

 



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