Rogers and Norton upgrade to Linetime Liberate SE case and practice management

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23 September 2014


Rogers and Norton Limited update to Liberate SE

Longterm Linetime users Norwich-based Solicitors, Rogers and Norton Limited, are updating their current Liberate case management and accounts systems to Liberate SE, the latest case and practice management systems from Leeds-based legal software specialist, Linetime Limited.

Director in charge of IT at the company, Bruce Faulkner, said: “We have always tried to give our clients the best possible service and to give our staff the best tools to enable them to do so.

“When it came to replacing some of our aging hardware, it made sense to look at updating our case management and accounts software at the same time. We have used Linetime products since 1989, initially DataFlow and Feestyle and then Liberate and have always been very pleased with the software both from its ease of use and its functionality and with the service provided by Linetime.

“When it came to updating our case and practice management software therefore, there seemed little point in looking any further than Liberate SE.”

The Linetime systems are based on a single Microsoft SQL server database and integrate seamlessly with Microsoft Exchange.

The Linetime case management system will provide the firm with a central repository for all correspondence, documentation and emails. This single store provides ready access to all members of the team to allow them to support their clients and to ensure that service levels are met. This complete and secure electronic file is also a boon to the firm’s Compliance Officers. All documents and processes can be controlled and audited to ensure that the firm’s high standards are adhered to in a consistent and efficient manner.



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