Record quarter for Eclipse Legal Systems

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2 March 2015


Eclipse200Law Society endorsed legal software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has reported strong ‘new-client’ quarterly results.

The 3-month period 1 October 2014 – 31 December 2014 saw a total of 36 firms sign contracts to implement Eclipse’s Proclaim Case and Practice Management Software solutions. The new clients range from established high-street practices through to boutique operators and new startups.

Eclipse highlights this last point as evidence of a renewed surge of entrepreneurial activity in the legal sector, with the new startups comprising both green-field businesses and ‘demergers’ away from established and larger legal services providers.

Eclipse’s Proclaim solution is the only Law Society Endorsed system of its type, providing complete end-to-end desktop management of all client and matter information. The system is in use by over 22,000 individuals, from Top 10 law firms through to sole practitioners.

Eclipse’s sales director, Dolores Evelyn, comments on the recent wins:

“It is fantastic to welcome onboard so many new clients, bringing with them such a broad range of industry expertise. By being able to provide both preconfigured and bespoke matter solutions, we are enabling law firms of all shapes, sizes and flavours to benefit from Proclaim.

“Our order book for 2015 is already looking extremely strong, and we look forward to announcing more new client wins in the very near future.”



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