Ralli Solicitors chooses inCase to help develop their own mobile app for personal injury clients

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1 October 2015


inCase200Long-standing north-west firm, Ralli Solicitors have chosen inCase to help them develop their own mobile app for their personal injury clients.

The firm has embarked on a number of long term projects to systemise and improve efficiency within the personal injury practice in the wake of the reforms.

Having recently implemented a new case management system, it was time to turn attention to enhancing communications between the firm and its clients. Amongst the number of benefits, with inCase integrating directly into their IT systems, it was the clear leader in its field.

Martin Coyne, Managing Director said, “inCase provides a one stop App for our clients, which contains all of their case data. They will have to do no more searching emails for documents – it’s all there inside the App, which is more efficient for them, and more economic for Ralli. Just perfect and easy!”

Sucheet Amin, managing director and founder of inCase said, “Martin is a seasoned and well-respected solicitor and businessman. As someone who has ‘seen it all’ I’m delighted that he and his team have chosen us as his partners in developing their own app.

“Our ability to use the technology and experiences that we have built up over the last 3 years puts us in a position to meet Ralli’s expectations which include brand management and client service.”



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