Quittance launches Work Accident Claim Centre

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3 October 2016


Quittance Personal Injury has launched the Work Accident Claim Centre (WACC).  WACC, which will operate alongside Quittance, will specialise in fast-track work injury claims and industrial disease claims.

WACC will provide a platform for people who have been injured at work to discuss their options for seeking compensation with a dedicated advisor. The platform will also offer a library of content dedicated to informing and helping injured employees.

Using a bespoke triage process, WACC advisors will identify the solicitor with the most relevant expertise from Quittance’s dedicated work accident panel. Advisors will then recommend the solicitor’s services to the potential claimant.

Joining the Work Accident Claim Centre panel will be of particular interest to solicitors looking for employers’ liability claims work that has undergone detailed triage. The part-automated triage process filters enquiries to ensure that, whether or not an enquiry amounts to a valid injury claim, the injured party is directed to the most relevant resources.

WACC will acquire clients exclusively online. The company is augmenting its in house-digital marketing team to support the launch and development of the WACC website and brand in the increasingly challenging and competitive landscape of legal services.

Chris Salmon, director of operations at Quittance, said “Employers’ liability work has been an area of significant growth for Quittance. The Work Accident Claim Centre marks the next stage of our evolution. By focusing on specific categories of claim, we hope to continue to tailor and improve the claimant’s experience of seeking advice and pursuing a claim for compensation. ”

Quittance are offering an open invitation to firms with a specialism in employers’ liability to join the Work Accident Claim Centre panel.

 



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