Quittance announce sponsorship of The Silverlining

Print This Post

19 August 2016


Quittance logo-High Res200Quittance Personal Injury have announced their corporate sponsorship of The Silverlining, the brain injury charity.

The Silverlining Charity is a group of like-minded people who aim to improve the quality of life of all those affected by brain injury. The charity’s work engages brain injured people with the wider community in such a way which invigorates, motivates and rehabilitates to discover a sense of purpose, social structure and added meaning to their lives.

The Charity offers a forum for people who have sustained a brain injury, family members, carers, professionals or volunteers who are keen to support and be involved.

Chris Salmon, operations director at Quittance Personal Injury said “Quittance Personal Injury’s panel of solicitors are involved in many claimants’ lives during their recovery and recuperation. As such we see the difference that charities make to the lives of our clients. The Silverlining do amazing work helping to rebuild lives through free community support services for all of those affected by brain injury.

Speaking on behalf of The Silverlining, marketing director Jamie Bedford said “We would like to emphasise how we seek to work closely and impartially with other charities, sponsors and supporters to ensure we can offer the best services possible to all of our Silverliners and we would be happy to hear from those who are interested in getting involved in our work.”



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

Rating lawyers by their wins and losses – a good idea?

Robert Ambrogi

Lawyers will give you any number of reasons why their win-loss rates in court are not accurate reflections of their legal skills. Yet a growing number of companies are evaluating lawyers by this standard – compiling and analysing lawyers’ litigation track records to help consumers and businesses make more-informed hiring decisions. The shortcomings of evaluating lawyers by win rates are many. Not least of them is that so few cases ever make it to a win or loss. Of equal concern is that, in the nuances of law practice, it is not always obvious what constitutes a win or a loss.

February 22nd, 2017