Proclaim Debt Recovery – enhanced integration with CCBC using SDT portal

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8 May 2015


SONY DSCLaw Society Endorsed legal software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has announced enhanced integration with the County Court Bulk Centre (CCBC) using the Secure Data Transfer (SDT) portal.

The integration is available for the benefit of Eclipse clients, within Proclaim’s Debt Recovery Case Management Software system.  A wide new range of services is available, encompassing the submission of a request for a claim, request for judgement, automated retrieval of defendant responses, warrant requests, and notification of paid cases.

The development utilises Proclaim’s Task Server ‘robot’ tool to minimise manual processes and automate as much of the workflow and data transmission as possible.  Claims are submitted to the SDT via the Proclaim desktop environment, at the click of a button.  Data verification is included to ensure that, pre-submission, all relevant information is included – and users are alerted to any missing elements in real-time.  Once the claims have been processed and issued, feedback on case progress is managed by Proclaim’s Task Server and fed into the respective originating cases, updating users by way of Proclaim’s integrated task management system.  All data submitted to, and retrieved from, CCBC is encrypted to ensure security in transit.

The integration has proved to be a success, with Eclipse reporting one newly-implemented commercial client already processing upwards of 1,000 files per week.

Tracy Blencowe, business solutions director at Eclipse, comments:

“This integration allows for quicker upload of volume claims in comparison to the previous CCBC data extract service.  Proclaim’s workflow can now further simplify claim production, ensuring a truly streamlined process, higher levels of accuracy, and a reduced administrative overhead.”

 



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