Premium service increases PI cover to £20 Million

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14 September 2016


tmgroup logo 200tmgroup has increased their professional indemnity (PI) Insurance cover from £10 million to £20 million, as part of a series of enhancements to their premium service.

These improvements have been specially designed around the unique requirements of professional support lawyers; and carefully considered to give them the support they need to confidently deliver to their colleagues whilst upholding the best interests of their clients and others who rely upon the conveyancing searches.

The premium terms and conditions are easier to read 

In addition to increasing their professional indemnity (PI) insurance cover to £20 million, tmgroup has also simplified their premium terms and conditions into a single, straight-forward document.

This makes them easier to read, whilst retaining the comprehensive cover tmgroup has been providing since 2006.

Current premium customers will automatically benefit from these changes

Customers already using the premium service will automatically benefit from these enhancements, while any customers currently using tmgroup’s general terms and conditions are advised to talk to their account manager about the benefits of upgrading.

If you are not currently working with tmgroup and would like to find out more about how you can benefit from these premium terms and conditions, fill out this simple information request form and we’ll be in touch.

About tmgroup

The new and improved premium terms and conditions are available as part of tmgroup’s new premium service offering to the profession.

Visit http://www.tmgroup.co.uk/ for more details.



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