Peppermint Technology is double finalist in UK IT Industry Awards

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20 October 2014


Peppermint’s founder and CEO, Arlene Adams

Peppermint Technology, the legal technology innovator, has been made a finalist in two categories of the UK IT Industry Awards 2014. These prestigious awards are the benchmark for outstanding performance throughout the UK computer industry and are supported by Computing and BCS (The Chartered Institute for IT).

The awards focus on the contribution of individuals, projects, organisations and technologies that have excelled in the use, development and deployment of IT in the past 12 months. They attract entries from some of the UK’s leading businesses including Virgin Media, MBNA, EE, Lloyds Banking, John Lewis and Centrica. Alongside these household names Peppermint has been shortlisted for small supplier of the year in the organisational excellence group and, in the technology innovation group, for cloud provider innovation of the year.

Peppermint’s founder and CEO Arlene Adams commented:

“It’s amazing that a young and relatively small business like Peppermint is sitting alongside such huge British industrial heavyweights. Having our achievements recognised on a national scale, across all business sectors, shows that Peppermint is truly punching above its weight in the UK IT industry.”

 



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