Own-it intellectual property clinics expand to Manchester

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26 March 2012


The UK’s only intellectual property advisory service tailored to the needs of the creative sector, Own-it, has announced it is expanding its service to Manchester.

The pro bono initiative, which helps creative practitioners and small and medium-sized creative businesses access intellectual property advice at crucial stages in their business development, has been made possible by Manchester-based law firm Ralli.

Support from 14 law firms inLondon, including Simmons & Simmons, has allowed for notable success.

Robert Illidge, marketing executive at Ralli, said: “I’m delighted to announce our partnership with Own-it, which will make us the first northern-based law firm to offer the pro bono clinics on a sustainable basis.

“As a passionate law firm, we are dedicated to providing the best intellectual property advice to innovators in businesses of all sizes and not-for-profit organisations. Following remarkable success inLondon, the expansion of Own-it’s offering toManchesterwill assist the growth of creative businesses in the region, boosting what is an already rapidly developing industry. These are exciting times.”

Creative businesses or sole traders can register on the Own-it website for free and submit IP queries. The expansion will look to serve a community of more than 25,000 registered users.

Own-it is part of the student enterprise and employability service based at the University of the Arts London. Own-it was set up in 2004 by London College of Communication and the now dissolved LDA and since that time over 25,000 creative businesses and practitioners have used its services.

 



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