Online v offline

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7 January 2015


Such - PhotoBy Sucheet Amin ( CEO of inCase, Lavatech )

This week, John Lewis released it’s Christmas period sales showing that in the five weeks to the end of December, it’s like-for-like sales rose by 4.8% compared to the previous year.

What is really impressive is that online purchases were up a whopping 19% which simply means that the growth is purely down to John Lewis being accessible on the internet. I’ve got to be honest, I did all of my shopping online this year. I didn’t make a single purchase at the counter opting instead for the Amazon app.

It is great at finding something quickly, buying and delivering within a few clicks. The reviews are helpful too – you can’t get those in a store. And this is where online has an advantage over offline. Sure, you can’t actually see and touch the product, essential for “big-ticket” purchases but you can see a number of images from different angles; zoom in for finer detail; read product specification; read reviews and; arrange for next day delivery with it gift wrapped!

Far easier than tackling the local shopping centre for several hours…in contrast, a purchase took several minutes and arrived ready to go straight under the tree! No wonder businesses are spending so much money, time and effort in their online presence. Without it, they would be falling behind to their competitors who would otherwise be getting better and better at selling online while they stood still.

 



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