Nottingham Law School launches new course in Legal Services Regulation

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13 August 2013


The Legal Services Act 2007 has brought about some radical changes to regulation and compliance in the legal sector and it can be difficult to keep up. In response to this Nottingham Law School has launched a new PG Cert in Legal Services Regulation, to help practitioners get to grips with the theoretical background and practical impact of the new regulatory framework.

Designed to meet the needs of those working in management and compliance in the legal services sector, the PG Cert Legal Services Regulation will be of particular interest to those in operational or financial management positions, compliance officers, managing partners, senior accountants or those working as independent consultants to legal businesses.

The course is delivered over one year with attendance at three study weekends. The weekends cover three discrete units; Practice Management and Risk; Financial Management and Risk; and Regulatory Theory and Practice. These units have been designed to focus on the main professional career tracks which are being developed in the sector, the Compliance Officer for Legal Practice and the Compliance Officer for Finance and Administration. The third unit, regulatory theory and practice, will ensure that all participants have grounding in regulatory theory which will underpin their sector specific role.

Work in this area has tended to silo into consideration of a single framework, whether that of the SRA, the BSB or IPS. This course is the first to consider all aspects of regulation of the sector, how each regulator approaches the task and how the regulated population can evidence compliance without breaking the bank.

The PG Cert Legal Services Regulation starts in September 2013 and you can find out more at www.ntu.ac.uk/lsr

 

 



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