New version of Omnia Legal Software “Mitchell-compliant”

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21 January 2014


Sue Nash, Omnia Legal Software and Litigation Costs Services

The landmark Mitchell judgment had not only costs lawyers but also the wider legal market in a frenzy as the implications of the stringent ruling were turned over and analysed in great detail.

Now , the costs budgeting software created by leading costs lawyer Sue Nash, has been updated to include ‘Mitchell-compliant’ costs budgeting for its users.

As we all know, Mr Mitchell’s solicitors failed to comply with the new costs budgeting rules – they failed to get their proposed budget filed and served in time.

The latest version of Omnia Legal Software features an updated dashboard that alerts users not only when their budget limit is approaching, but also when their court or litigation deadlines are approaching.

Sue Nash, who created Omnia Legal Software and is also founder of costs law firm Litigation Costs Services, says:

“The Court of Appeal sent out a clear message that lawyers need to become much more efficient and comply with the relevant rules. Omnia Legal Software helps solicitors to avoid falling foul of the rules as Mr Mitchell’s solicitors did.”




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