Money laundering doesn’t have to be painful

Print This Post

1 April 2016


Ongoing money laundering training is a real drag for solicitors. Regulation 21 of the Money Laundering Regulations 2007 requires that law firms “regularly provide training” on the topic.

Most firms comply with refresher training every 12-18 months that merely rehash the legislation and CDD procedures. This has led many solicitors to have a jaded attitude towards the training and they don’t take it seriously… until now.

Introducing AML 360

Big picture money laundering training

vinciworks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today VinciWorks released AML 360 — the perfect refresher course for users that claim to know it all. Instead of rehashing the legislation and CDD procedures, the course goes beyond the basics by engaging learners with the hot topics of the day.

The interactivity and rapid pace of the course creates an immersive experience in which users take an active role in the material rather than passively consuming information.

AML 360° is geared towards lawyers or support staff who have already undertaken money laundering training and understand the subject matter.

It delves into more detail and explores emerging areas such as bitcoin and the Fourth Money Laundering Directive.

The course covers eight subjects in less than 20 minutes with the following fast-paced modules:

  • Bitcoin: The dangers of virtual currency
  • How do criminals abuse law firms?
  • EU Fourth Directive: What’s new?
  • Red flags of money laundering
  • CDD: When to do it and what to do
  • Hollywood explains money laundering
  • Is your practice area at risk?
  • Source of wealth and funds

Demo the course

 

 



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

Is it time solicitors started taking ethics training more seriously?

mena_ruparel

The requirement for solicitors to behave ethically in modern legal practice is more relevant than ever. Solicitors are still held in fairly high regard by the public, although that esteem is on the wane according to last year’s Trusted Professions poll by Ipsos Mori. Lawyers are less trusted than teachers and doctors but at least we prevail over accountants and bankers. We still hold a position of trust but we must work to hold that position. The current Solicitors Regulation Authority proposals to revise the Handbook are evidence that work still needs to be done.

June 21st, 2017