mmadigital to help judge the Modern Law awards

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2 June 2014


“We’re here to encourage and assist with the evolution of how lawyers and law firms communicate their services to clients”

mmadigital’s CEO, Dez Derry, has been asked to help judge this year’s Modern Law awards.

The awards, sponsored by Eclipse Proclaim, were launched in 2013 to celebrate and identify sparkling talent and success in entrepreneurship, market development, business management and best practice in the modern legal services arena.

“I’m very proud to have been asked to be a judge on this year’s panel,” says Dez “We work in an industry that defines what a modern law firm should look like and so I hope to bring a unique ‘digital’ twist to the judging process.

“Traditional methods of marketing simply won’t cut it in today’s legal sector and the ethos behind the Modern Law awards matches mmadigital’s, in that we’re both here to encourage and assist with the evolution of how lawyers and law firms communicate their services to clients.”

Dez joins an experienced judging panel made up of experts from across the sector and related industries, chaired by prominent legal sector strategist Professor Stephen Mayson.

There are 19 categories to enter in the 2014 awards, recognising individuals, teams and law firms. Entries are open until 1 August 2014, with the winners announced at a ceremony on 15 October 2014, at The London Hilton on Park Lane.



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