Microsoft invites Peppermint to Enterprise Cloud Alliance

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16 August 2016


PrintPeppermint Technology, the award winning legal cloud solution provider, has become a member of Microsoft’s Enterprise Cloud Alliance. This brings together the best-in-class enterprise and cloud solutions in strategic engagements with Microsoft.

Membership of the alliance is by invitation only and provides Peppermint, a Microsoft gold certified partner, with direct access to the Microsoft Cloud and Enterprise team. The alliance forms part of Peppermint’s ongoing strategy to enable its customers to quickly respond to the constantly changing business needs in the legal market.

Mike Walker, Peppermint CTO, commented, “We launched our second-generation Peppermint Cloud earlier this year. We’ve migrated twenty-five of our law firm customers, and are taking more live over the next few months.

We are investing further and enhancing our relationship with Microsoft, and participation in the Enterprise Cloud Alliance will help us ensure our customers get even more value from the Peppermint Cloud using Microsoft Dynamics and Microsoft Azure.

“Entry to this ‘inner circle’ gives us early insight to Microsoft’s future plans and developments for its cloud and dynamics products, and provides the opportunity to meet and collaborate with some of the leading cloud and technology gurus in the world. This ensures Peppermint, and our customers, stay ahead of the curve.”

“We are happy to welcome Peppermint to the Enterprise Cloud Alliance,” said Chris Lwanga, Microsoft’s principal program manager. “Peppermint’s expertise and solutions are great additions to what we can offer our Alliance members and enterprise customers.”

 



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