Material or non-material? That is the question

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12 June 2013


is running a series of free interactive webinars for Riliance subscribers looking at the obligations firms have to record and report breaches, and what is likely to constitute a material and non-material breach; each webinar comes with a set of real life case studies for attendees to consider and debate.

Brian Rogers, Director of Risk and Compliance, is running the webinars and said;

“This area is obviously causing firms some real headaches as we have seen a very high demand for the webinars; we had 60 bookings within 2 hours and now have 24 fully booked sessions with a waiting list for the next batch of dates!

I have run three sessions so far and both interactivity by attendees, and feedback, has been excellent; it is clear that COLP/COFAs want, and need, a forum in which to look at case studies and then debate them looking at the types of questions that should be asked to try and determine whether a breach is material or not.

Firms clearly need to understand what is required of them under the rules, but there comes a time when they also need to see how these rules might work in real life scenarios; these webinars give them the best of both worlds”.

Riliance subscribers interested in attending future webinars should contact the Riliance client services team at clientservices@riliance.co.uk.

Non-Riliance subscribers interested in attending future webinars should contact Mark Gidge, Chief Executive on 01829 731201.



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