Managing Client Relationships – The Truth in Professional Services 2013 benchmark study

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28 February 2013


The “Managing Client Relationships – the truth in professional services” 2013 benchmark study is now live. It’s being undertaken by Managing Partners Forum in conjunction with The Thriving Company, and is said to be unique in tracking the effort and processes used by professional firms to manage client relationships, identifying those with the greatest correlation with success,  gaining feedback on the performance of systems and advisors, and providing expert commentary and ideas.

According to Robin Dicks of Thriving, “The ability of a professional firm to manage complex client relationships defines their competitive edge, and secures sustainable revenue streams. It’s important to know how your firm’s efforts stack up against peers, and the best practice that improves client relationships, delivers returns, and ensures you get the best from any systems used.” As one participant in last year’s study said: “I believe you have hit a nerve!…We are reviewing 2011 efforts and preparing initiatives for 2012. Thank you for providing such timely information.”

Click HERE to take part before 4 March. It takes around 15 minutes, and all participants will receive a FREE executive report of the findings when the study is completed.

 



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