LexisNexis joins Stonewall Diversity Champions

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13 May 2013


LexisNexis UK today announced that it has joined Stonewall’s Diversity Champions programme. The programme promotes equality in the workplace to ensure that LGB (lesbian, gay and bisexual) staff can perform to their full potential.

The programme has been helping businesses and public services to create inclusive workplace cultures for a decade; and currently has over 600 members. While the programme is LGB-centric, its best practice can also be used across all strands of diversity to improve equality for all staff.

Laurie Hibbs, LexisNexis HR director, said: “LexisNexis is committed to maintaining and developing an open, inclusive work environment where people can be themselves. We are proud to be joining the Diversity Champions programme, and to have the opportunity to work with Stonewall and other Diversity Champions to develop our work around sexual orientation.”

Stonewall is Britain’s leading LGB equality charity. Established in 1989, Stonewall has been instrumental in changing the legislative environment in Britain. Its campaigning work and policy expertise spans areas including health, education, media, and hate crime.

Chris Edwards, client manager at Stonewall, added: “We are delighted to be working with LexisNexis through our Diversity Champions programme. LexisNexis has recognised that there are positive steps they can make to further improve the working lives of LGB employees. Our members are progressive employers who want to recruit, recognise, and support the very best staff. The best employers understand that providing support for all their staff improves their operational effectiveness.”



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