Legal Eye announce partnership with Purple Legal Network

Print This Post

9 April 2015


LegalEye200Legal Eye are delighted to announce its partnership with Purple Legal Network (PLN), a national support and referral group for law firms. Legal Eye joins PLN as a recommended partner to the Network’s plethora of support services. Legal Eye provides the members of PLN with a unique risk management and PII package. With an offering of a free mini “health” check (worth £400), which covers reviews of client care letters, terms & conditions, websites, invoice precedents, ICO registration and a selection of policies, there appears to be no better time for sole practitioners and small legal practices to embrace PLN and its new partner.

Jaunita Gobby, director of Legal Eye, explains:

“We are delighted to be working with Purple Legal Network. Compliance continues to be a focus for law firms; risk management and best practice are becoming more and more important. Our offering will further enhance the work the Purple Legal Network currently offer their members.”

The Purple Legal Network combines the primary focus of referrals of legal work outside practice areas of expertise, with introductions to a range of trusted partners for additional support.

Emma Shotton, head of Purple Legal Network, comments:

“Our partnership offerings are just as important to us as our business referrals because the PLN’s ultimate goal is supporting the sector as best we can.

We are excited about having Legal Eye on board and are proud to promote their exceptional services. We understand the extra strains on smaller firms with compliance issues and adhering to the SRA’s guidelines. Anything PLN can do to support our members is something the team and I strive consistently to work towards, especially when the services provided through our partnerships are discounted for those firms who are part of the Network”.

 



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

Be careful you do not leave anything behind: will we see the end of chambers?

Charles Feeny

Experience of practice by digital support suggests that working practices will become much more informal and spontaneous, not requiring support by specific entities or even contractual arrangements. This is likely to be particularly true of the Bar, which is or should be a profession focusing on individuals. The future of the Bar is more likely to resemble a library as seen in Scotland and Ireland – albeit an electronic library – rather than the traditional chambers structure.

January 18th, 2017