Leeds Law Society joins Clio’s Partnership Program

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4 August 2016


Clio 200Clio has welcomed Leeds Law Society to the Clio Partnership Program. This partnership allows the Society’s members to subscribe to Clio at a discounted rate. They join over 50 law societies and bar associations internationally who offer Clio as a member benefit.

“We’re excited to be offering Clio as a member benefit to Leeds Law Society” said Derek Fitzpatrick Clio’s general manager for the EMEA region.

“Clio’s powerful practice management platform helps legal professionals mobilise and modernise their practice through the benefits of cloud-computing, and now Leeds Law Society’s almost 4000 members have an extra reason to subscribe.”

Leeds Law Society is one of the biggest and most powerful law societies in the UK. With a prestigious history and a dynamic modern board of directors, they are connected to key decision makers across the city, across the region and across the country.

As part of a national network of law societies, they regularly welcome some of the biggest names in the legal industry to Leeds and make sure their members get access to the people that matter.

Joanna Dixon, business development manager at Leeds Law Society added “Leeds Law Society is delighted to have Clio as a key sponsor for 2016/2017.  The services they provide are pivotal to the legal industry and we look forward to long and healthy relationship.”

Clio is the world’s leading cloud-based legal practice management software, providing time, billing and client collaboration tools for over 40,000 small and mid-sized law firms in over 50 countries. Web-enabled, mobile-friendly, and built specifically for the legal profession, Clio delivers all the tools modern law firms need to run a successful practice.

To learn more about Clio’s Partnership Program, visit clio.co.uk.



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