Leaving a digital legacy

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15 April 2015


Planned Departure 200Cancer Research have just finished trialing a world first concept which they claim could shift fundraising from collection boxes and ‘chuggers’ to an entirely new level. The charity partnered with Clear Channel to implement a campaign which enables customers who walk past Cancer Research outlets in Brighton, Kensington, Guildford or Marylebone to tap their card on the contactless payment point on the window to donate a fixed fee of £2.

It seems like every day brings a new digital advantage into our lives, enabling us to interact, consume and communicate in easier, more streamlined ways. For each new digital asset however, comes the increasingly pressing need to ensure we are managing our digital assets more effectively.

As Gary Rycroft, a member of the Law Society Wills and Equity Committee, recently outlined during a BBC Radio 5 Live interview, leaving a digital legacy now needs to be taken very seriously. Rycroft recommended leaving a Will that takes into account a person’s  wishes regarding their personal online accounts. As he highlighted, this is the only way to ensure that loved ones know where and what the accounts are, and that they know what to do with them.

Rycroft concluded the interview explaining that “it’s our job as solicitors to tell our clients that they need to think about these things,” as a consequence there is an ongoing project at the Law Society to give advice to the profession on how best to do this.

As the likes of Cancer Research look for new ways to attract funding by making the payment process easy and rapid, children’s charity bibic are actively looking at new ways of attracting legacies and have shifted their focus to digital legacies which they believe will help boost funding.

Protecting, storing, passing on and safeguarding our digital legacies are giving rise to new needs, the likes of which Planned Departure are anticipating and managing for hundreds of clients.

 

 



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