Leading Cardiff firm invests to underpin conveyancing growth

Print This Post

5 June 2015


PrintOchresoft continues to consolidate its position as the UK’s leading conveyancing workflow provider with the signing of Hek Jones. The Cardiff-based property specialist is set to deploy the Intelliworks platform to support its busy residential conveyancing team.

For managing partner Darren Hek the project is more than just ticking the compliance, standards and productivity boxes: “We know that Intelliworks will ease the administrative burden, help us manage risk and underpin consistent working; but for us specifically, it also offers the opportunity to reengineer our team so that we can develop our assistants more quickly, have them supporting our fee earners more effectively and improve overall capacity and throughput, without sacrificing either the quality of our work or our standards of customer care. It will allow us to grow our volumes significantly with just an anticipated small incremental rise in headcount, all the time providing a very user-friendly, up-to-date control framework for all elements of the conveyancing process.”

Ochresoft’s Pauline Freegard comments: “Intelliworks has established itself as the leading workflow tool by transaction volume for the conveyancing profession, and increasingly we are seeing it as a central pillar in firms’ efforts to position themselves for the future. Its compliance and productivity benefits are well established but firms are also looking to it to help them structure their teams and fine-tune different levels of skilled resource to create highly proficient, profitable departments.”

www.ochresoft.com
@ochresoft



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

Be careful you do not leave anything behind: will we see the end of chambers?

Charles Feeny

Experience of practice by digital support suggests that working practices will become much more informal and spontaneous, not requiring support by specific entities or even contractual arrangements. This is likely to be particularly true of the Bar, which is or should be a profession focusing on individuals. The future of the Bar is more likely to resemble a library as seen in Scotland and Ireland – albeit an electronic library – rather than the traditional chambers structure.

January 18th, 2017