Lawyer equips firms with everything they need to comply

Print This Post

30 July 2012


A partner at national law firm Weightmans is helping other firms with their own legislative obligations with the publication of the Law Society’s COLPs Toolkit.

Weightmans’ Michelle Garlick has written the comprehensive publication for the Law Society’s Risk and Compliance Service in order to help firms adhere to the requirements of the Legal Services Act – specifically the Solicitors Regulation Authority’s (SRA) obligation to have an authorised compliance officer for legal practice (COLP) from January 2013.

Ms Garlick, who heads up a team at Weightmans advising law firms on regulatory compliance, believes that the implementation of this new requirement should not be daunting or stressful if firms ensure they have a COLP on board sooner rather than later: “The COLP will ensure that a firm has systems and controls in place to enable the firm, its managers and employees, to comply with the SRA Handbook.

“The Toolkit I’ve put together will help practitioners best prepare for their duties as COLPs, hopefully making the process as simple and efficient as possible.”

The publication, available to purchase on the Law Society website, is accompanied by a CD-ROM containing draft policies, procedural checklists, including:

  • Internal governance documentation;
  • Breach recording and reporting forms;
  • Compliance checklists; and
  • Draft letters to the SRA.

The COLPs Toolkit is available for £59.95. Click .

 



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate

Tags: ,



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Disruptive innovation: the Christensen thesis hits law schools and legal services

Roger Smith

A report from the Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation warns that law schools in the US are “in crisis” and doomed unless they must respond positively to the “disruption of the traditional model for the provision of legal services”. The report relishes the coming of Armageddon by a sector whose financial viability it says will soon be choked off by the transformation of the legal market. How does this thesis stack up from the other side of the Atlantic?

February 28th, 2017