Laird on recruitment drive due to expansion with Expert Witness services

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1 July 2014


Laird are recruiting, to cope with increased demand

Laird, the expert witness services firm for the legal and insurance sector, are currently undergoing a recruitment drive to ensure they are staffed efficiently to deal with the increased number of instructions.  The firm, largely known in the industry for being independent motor engineers inspecting over 3000 vehicles a month, have over the last couple of years, expanded their portfolio of services developing the company into a leading Expert Witness services firm.

The nationwide firm based from their head office on the Wirral, employs over 60 staff and undertake a wide range of services, falling into 3 main categories – Automotive, Photography and Language services.  You can view the full range of services here.

Nik Ellis, MD, says “We have established ourselves as experts at processing volume instructions whilst still maintaining outstanding levels of customer service and accuracy.  We were regularly being asked if we could provide other services, such as witness statements and interpretation on cases, because our Principals trusted our service and found it easy to instruct one single source.  We have spent the last couple of years perfecting those further services and the systems that work alongside them.  We are now regularly asked to provide expert services other than Vehicle Damage reports.”

To cope with the increased demand and ensure they maintain their service levels, Laird are now recruiting for the following:

IT Support Technician

IT Developer

Salvage Co-ordinator

Logistics Co-ordinator

For more information on Laird services or jab vacancies, please contact Pippa Saunders on 0151 342 0670 or email pippa.saunders@laird-assessors.com



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