Keystone Legal launches Protect 36 – stand alone, Part 36 ATE insurance

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1 October 2013

After the event (ATE) insurer Keystone Legal is pleased to announce the launch of Protect 36, an ATE insurance policy designed to be taken out at the Part 36 stage of a personal injury (PI) claim.

Since the LASPO / Jackson changes on the 1st April, it is clear that many PI Solicitors and Firms are unsure as to the best way to approach the mediation and the ‘selling’ of ATE insurance with their Clients. This is especially the case now that ATE insurance is like any other ‘consumer’ insurance product and issues such as a policies features, benefits & value for money must be properly considered and a one size fits all solution may in many scenarios not represent best advice.

Andy Parker, Managing Director of Keystone Legal says “Protect 36 is aimed at Firms who don’t  need ‘day-1’ cover for all Clients but who do recognise that the bulk of the costs risk in the post-LASPO regime – i.e. adverse costs should a Part 36 offer not be beaten – means that cover certainly should be in place at this point”.

“Protect 36 allows Firms to take out a policy after a defendant Part 36 offer is made, and cover includes adverse costs, litigation disbursements and our unique damages indemnity / shortfall cover. As premiums are only payable should there be an increase in the Part 36 offer, we feel that Protect 36 offers excellent value for money for Clients and could well be the only cover you need for many PI case types.

Protect 36 can be used to cover all PI claim types (RTA, EL, PL, OL) and for Industrial Disease & Clinical Negligence cases. Cover is simple to explain, quick & easy to apply for online and the Part 36 damages indemnity / shortfall cover provides real peace of mind for Clients & Firms alike.

For more information about Protect 36 and our current ATE and LEI products and services, please contact

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