Kain Knight’s chairman is ‘Slave for a Day’ at law firm Anthony Gold

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11 April 2014


The chairman of one the UK’s largest firms of costs lawyers Kain Knight, last week became a ‘Slave for a Day’ at Anthony Gold Solicitors’ office in London.

Michael Kain, Kain Knight’s chairman, put himself up as an auction prize at the firm’s Charity Pop Quiz night in February, which was a fundraiser for The Alzheimer’s Society and Kent charity the Canterbury Oast Trust, which supports adults with learning disabilities.

The winning bid was made by Anthony Gold’s partner Clare Kelly, who promptly put him to work last week making tea and coffee and operating the photocopier.

In between tea and coffee duties, Michael shared his skills and experience with Anthony Gold’s staff based on over 40 years working in the field of costs.

Michael was released at 5pm for good behaviour and was then rewarded with a trip to the Shard with Clare.

Kain Knight successfully raised over £1800 for charity, with £1,500 going to the Alzheimer’s Society, and £300 to the Canterbury Oast Trust.

Michael Kain said:

“I can thoroughly recommend one day’s slavery at Anthony Gold. While my photocopying skills were a little rusty, I think I redeemed myself with my tea and coffee making. It was a fun day and it was for a couple of fantastic charities. I would like to thank Clare and all the staff at Anthony Gold for being such great hosts.”



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