Kain Knight hosts London insolvency seminar in October

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23 August 2013


Legal costs firm Kain Knight, market leaders in the legal costs industry, and The Judge, the world’s leading broker of commercial litigation funding and ATE insurance, are hosting a landmark seminar for insolvency practitioners and insolvency lawyers in October.

The seminar, to be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in the City of London at 08.00 on Thursday 10 October, will examine how the far-reaching Jackson reforms to civil litigation procedures which came into force this April will impact on the restructuring and insolvency market.

Nick Hood, a director at Kain Knight and an insolvency practitioner with the Begbies Traynor Group for the past 23 years, will chair the seminar.

The key note address will be given by Frances Coulson, Head of Insolvency and Business Recovery at solicitors Moon Beever and former President of R3, the insolvency trade body representing almost every UK licensed insolvency practitioner.  Frances will review the initial impact of Jackson, as well as the practical issues and uncertainties now facing insolvency practitioners, restructuring professionals and their advisors.

Litigation funding has been materially affected by the Jackson reforms.  James Blick from The Judge will explain the changes and set out the options now available to litigants.

The event is free of charge. To get full details and to register for the seminar, visit the Kain Knight website www.kain-knight.co.uk or call Penny Ridoutt at Kain Knight.

Contact:

Nick Hood

Media & Marketing Advisor, Kain Knight

Tel: +44 (0)7967 658 296

E: nick.hood@kain-knight.co.uk

www.kain-knight.co.uk

Twitter: @Kain_Knight

Neil Boom

MD, Gresham PR Ltd.

Tel: +44 (0) 7866 805 108

www.greshampr.co.uk

 



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