Kain Knight acquires Johnson & Johnson

Print This Post

13 November 2014


Kain Knight, one of the UK’s largest professional firms of costs lawyers, has acquired Johnson & Johnson Costs Lawyers and Consultants for an undisclosed sum.

Johnson & Johnson, based in St Austell and Exeter, is the latest acquisition under a business expansion strategy introduced by Kain Knight’s Chief Executive Officer, Peter Petyt, who joined the firm in April 2013.  The acquisition follows that of London-based Quantum Costs in November 2013 and Dubai-based Settle First in September 2014.

Johnson & Johnson was founded by Tony and Kathy Johnson in 1989. The Johnsons will remain with the business over the next few months to ensure a seamless handover. Kain Knight will be investing in both of the current Johnson & Johnson offices and is exploring further acquisitions and new offices in the South West region.

Kain Knight plans to continue its nationwide consolidation of the highly fragmented UK legal costs market, and is developing a range of new services to leverage its considerable experience and expertise in response to the reforms introduced by Lord Jackson in April 2013.

Commenting on the acquisition, Peter Petyt said:

“We are delighted to welcome the Johnson & Johnson teams to the Kain Knight group. We see a great deal of potential in the South West and will be making significant investment in human resources, technology, marketing and business development across the region.”

“Johnson & Johnson is the latest in a series of acquisitions Kain Knight is making up and down the country. We continue to believe, post Jackson, that only the very largest firms of costs lawyers will thrive in this new marketplace and we are firmly on course to become the largest independent legal costs business in the UK.”



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

The ethics of the SRA’s social media warning notice

Mena Ruparel

Social media portals are regularly used by firms and those who work for law firms in both professional and personal capacities. Their informal nature and the fast pace of use makes it all too easy for regulated people to get carried away with online discussions or comments which can fall foul of the regulator. This is more likely to happen on social media platforms as these are virtual, accessed in the solicitor’s own time and space. It can be easy to forget that solicitors are regulated just the same at 11pm on their home computer as they are at 3pm in the office or at court.

September 15th, 2017