Judges set to shortlist entries for the Yorkshire Lawyer Awards

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29 July 2013


The judging panel for the Yorkshire Lawyer Awards is set to meet soon, when it will decide which firms and individuals are to be shortlisted for Yorkshire’s premier legal event.  

Nominations closed on 8 July for the awards which will be held on 2 October at the New Dock Hall in Leeds. The event, headline sponsored by Am Trust, offers the county’s legal professionals the chance to come together for a memorable evening of networking, socialising and celebration.

The 2013 panel will once again be chaired by Jeremy Shulman from Shulmans Solicitors and Peter McCormick OBE, from McCormicks Solictors. Joining them will be Giles Searby (President of the Sheffield law Society/Hill Dickinson), Roger Dixon (Hague & Dixon Solicitors) and Peter Wright (President of the Yorkshire Union of Law Societies/ DigitalLawUK).

Organised by Barker Brooks Communications, publishers of Leeds & Yorkshire Lawyer, the awards have been bringing together the region’s legal community to recognise and celebrate its achievements since 2000.

Other sponsors on the night will include Prime Professions Ltd, New Park Court Chambers, Property Search Group, Towry, Yorkshire Cancer Research, Douglas Scott Recruitment and mmadigital.

This year’s shortlist will be revealed on 2 August, to get your tickets before they sell out, visit www.yorkshirelawyerawards.co.uk or contact Paul Bunce on 0844 858 2890 or at paul.bunce@barkerbrooks.co.uk

 



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