Jefferies Solicitors launches new motoring services with a specialist motoring barrister for every client

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4 March 2015


Michael Jefferies Injury Lawyers200Personal injury compensation specialist, Jefferies Solicitors, is extending its legal offering to include motoring offences.

From today, the law firm will be providing a nationwide ‘one-stop shop’ for clients facing motoring offences at a fixed price, with no hidden charges.

This new service will mean that customers enquiring about motoring offence claims will be entitled to have a free consultation with Counsel who specialise in this area. It is the first time that Jefferies Solicitors will be offering this type of dedicated consultation at such an early stage of proceedings.

Expert advice and representation will be available on every aspect of motoring offences, such as dangerous driving, drink driving and loss of license offences.

Michael Jefferies, Managing Director at Jefferies Solicitors, comments, “We’re pleased to be extending our legal offering to cover motoring offences, which is a growing sector. Working together with specialist barristers, combining joint marketing and specialist court skills means we can offer a niche and cost effective service to clients nationwide. The service will offer complete transparency from the initial consultation throughout the proceedings, making sure clients are kept fully informed during the entire process.”

 



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