Jefferies Solicitors expands into travel claims

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5 August 2016


Jefferies Solicitors 200Personal injury compensation specialist, Jefferies Solicitors, is extending its legal offering to include holiday sickness and accident claims following the launch of its flight claim service.

The new nationwide service will mean that holidaymakers will now be able to claim compensation for food poisoning, slips trips and falls, accidents during travel and swimming pool accidents. Compensation will also be available for holiday sickness and claims against tour operators.

Following a rise in the number of holiday claims, Jefferies Solicitors has a dedicated specialist team with extensive experience in the sector, to provide both expert advice and representation.

The newly expanded service also means that claimants can recover damages for other expenses such as the costs of medication or treatment, as well as any other financial losses due to loss of earnings. This is in addition to compensation for pain and suffering and loss of enjoyment on holiday.

Michael Jefferies, managing director at Jefferies Solicitors, comments, “With UK residents taking over 60 millions visits abroad each year, holidays have never been so popular. However, accidents can still happen on holiday, which is why we’ve launched this extension of our compensation service.

“With the summer holidays coming up, we expect to see an increase in the number of holiday sickness and accidents, which could result in compensation. Our specialist team offers complete transparency with no hidden fees, making sure clients are kept fully informed during the process.”



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