Invest In Law becomes a supporter of the World Justice Project

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25 February 2014


Invest In Law has become a proud supporter of the World Justice Project (WJP). WJP was founded to promote the rule of law around the world, to strengthen communities and encourage opportunity and equity. WJP has three mutually reinforcing programs: Research and Scholarship, the WJP Rule of Law Index, and Engagement initiatives.

Research and Scholarship: The WJP’s Research & Scholarship program conducts and supports rigorous research that examines the relationship between the rule of law and various aspects of economic, political, and social development.

WJP Rule of Law Index: The WJP Rule of Law Index is a quantitative assessment tool that measures how the rule of law is experienced by ordinary people in 99 countries around the globe. It offers a detailed, multidimensional view of the extent to which countries adhere to the rule of law in practice, and is the most comprehensive index of its kind.

Engagement: The WJP’s Engagement efforts convene partners from all work disciplines to build a global network, find common ground, and create practical solutions that advance the rule of law. Initiatives include the World Justice Challenge, the World Justice Forum, regional outreach meetings, single-country sorties, and more.

There are many ways UK firms can be supporters too.



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