inCase helps simplify the process for clients of McHale & Co Solicitors

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26 March 2015


inCase200The mobile app phenomenon that is inCase secured another law firm after impressing the partners with its simplicity, effectiveness and ease of use for clients and fee earners alike.

McHale & Co Solicitors, led by managing partner Andrew McHale recognised the need to adapt to their clients continual needs to see where their case is up to at any time of day.

Andrew believes that the app will simplify the process for clients. “We are responding to the way clients consume personal injury services by getting an app for their convenience.

inCase mobile app“With inCase, a client is automatically sent instructions how to download the App and if they choose to use it they can track their case with literally the touch of a button. This speeds up the process for both the client and solicitor. The client can still call up the solicitor if they want but in most instances they will not need to as they can find most of the information about their case and where it is up to online.”

inCase mobile appFounder and developer of inCase Sucheet Amin commented, “McHale & Co recognise the importance of mobile apps as part of their client offering. Even with a broad range of foreign clients, they know that their clients will get value from inCase as it gives the freedom and flexibility to not only find out what is going on but also provide instructions and sign documents with a real signature 24/7. That allows McHale’s fee earners to be more effective in the post-LASPO era but also right at the forefront of using mobile app technology.”

 



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