inCase goes “over the water” into Northern Ireland

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25 February 2015


inCase200The continued expansion and interest for personal injury as well as conveyancing law firms took a hop, skip and a jump over to Northern Ireland.

Paschal J O’Hare Solicitors with offices in Belfast and Carrickfergus decided to embrace the inCase mobile app solution as part of its personal injury services.

Principal, Patrick O’Hare explained why he decided to use mobile app technology. “We’ve recognised long since my father first set up the practice in 1969 that technology was an important part of delivering our services.

inCase mobile app“When we saw inCase both myself and my IT manager felt that this was an excellent “plug and go” solution. What I didn’t know was whether my client base would use it. So we conducted a limited survey to 70 clients asking if they would use and like a mobile app for us to send them messages, letters and updates. 68 responded and all of them unequivocally said ‘yes’. That was more than enough as the product is brilliant.”

Founder and developer of inCase Sucheet Amin commented, “we are delighted to have moved further afield with inCase.

inCase mobile app“To be in the Northern Ireland market with plenty of local interest is testament to the versatility of what we have developed and Patrick’s firm is another example of a business recognising the importance of mobile app technology in their business.”

 



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