How to grow and diversify your business with Eclipse Proclaim Practice Management system

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13 January 2015


Eclipse200Curtis Law was founded in 2008, employing five staff to deal with personal injury claims. Since that time the firm has extended its reach into family law, conveyancing, probate and commercial areas and now employs 200 staff across the group.

Set up initially as a PI claims specialist, Curtis Law had strong ambitions to grow both in headcount and in the range of legal work managed.

Curtis Law initially needed a case management solution that would provide a flexible and future-proof environment – one that could be scaled out to multiple work areas, not just PI.

Following a detailed analysis of available solutions, Eclipse’s was selected. A solid track record in helping new start-up businesses to grow was a strong pull, as was the ability to add practice accounts at a later stage. Curtis Law took the opportunity to do just this – replacing the incumbent ‘bureau’ accounts system to create a fully integrated .

Proclaim is used across all work areas, providing a complete desktop productivity solution. Client care is top of the firm’s agenda; the ability to rapidly see where any file is up to – and provide feedback for clients – is a huge benefit. As a growing practice, managing finances is vital. Curtis Law has been able to monitor and analyse ongoing performance, using Proclaim’s integrated reporting toolset. This means that trends can be spotted, empowering the management team to quickly make informed operational and growth decisions.

Tasleem Riaz, principal, Curtis Law LLP said: “Proclaim provides a robust, scalable and flexible solution that is perfectly in tune with our commercial aims.”
 



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