Free Webinar: Tech Competency for Lawyers

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4 July 2016


Clio 200Clio, the world’s leading cloud-based legal practice management system, present a free hour long webinar on how lawyers can achieve simple technological competency.

Since 2012, Twenty-one US states have adopted rules that require technical competency among lawyers. What does this mean? Lawyers are required to not only keep up with changes to the law and its practice but also the wide range of technology that can be used in the delivery of their services.

This means staying abreast of the potential risks—and benefits—associated with any technology they use.

While the ethical opinions of many states focus on increasingly complex computing processes—like metadata analysis and e-discovery—lawyers should also consider the untapped gains offered by the technology they already use.

Word processing software, email services, and practice management tools all offer features that most lawyers have yet to adopt.

Join Clio Lawyer in Residence Joshua Lennon and D. Casey Flaherty as they explore how to achieve simple technological competency and how you and your clients will benefit. Learn to leverage your firm’s technology to:

  • Evaluate your current technology knowledge
  • Explore key features in the software you already own
  • Create continuous technology training at your law firm

RSVP now for Tech Competency for Lawyers, taking place on Tuesday 12th July at 6pm GMT.



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