First4Lawyers records 30% panel increase

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22 April 2015


F4L_logo_simple_CMYKFirst4Lawyers, the fastest-growing marketing collective in the UK, has expanded its panel of law firms by just over 30% in the first quarter of 2015, with almost 50 clinical negligence and personal injury (PI) law firms now on board.

The addition of 14 new panel members in the last three months – including Yorkshire firm Wise Solicitors, McKeag & Co in Newcastle, Coventry’s Brindley Twist Tafft & James and Taylor & Emmet of Sheffield – demonstrates the increasing value firms see in pooling marketing resources in the highly competitive PI and clinical negligence markets. They join established members including: JMW (Manchester), Russell & Russell (Bolton), SGI Legal (Liverpool) and Michael W Halsall Solicitors (Newton-le-Willows).

First4Lawyers’ business development head Chris Rodgers says: “Personal injury is one of the most expensive search terms on Google and even good-sized firms find it hard to compete. More and more firms are starting to realise that, by becoming members of a marketing collective, they can break into the upper echelons of PI advertisers that would previously have been way out of reach.

“Only by joining forces with other like-minded firms can they go head-to-head with the biggest names in the market to produce leads through television and online marketing.”

First4lawyers’ high-profile TV campaign fronted by sports personality, turned TV presenter, Andrew Castle has fuelled rapid growth for the business over the last three years. Last November, the business launched its first dedicated medical negligence TV advertisement in response to a doubling of claims enquiries received over the previous 12 months. This is all underpinned by a vigorous approach to vetting potential claimants, zero tolerance to fraud and a highly ethical approach to customer service and marketing.



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