Family Law Company looks to grow with SOS Connect

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20 May 2015


SOS200The South West’s largest family law company has replaced its incumbent IT system with SOS Connect from Solicitors Own Software (SOS) as it embarks on a new phase of growth.

The Family Law Company has 75 people based in Plymouth and Exeter and operates across the full range of family law disciplines, taking in both private and Legal Aid work.

“When I joined the company around a year ago I took soundings about our IT and it was apparent that people were not content with the system which was in place,” says chief operating officer Jake Moores.

“I then began looking at what else was out there in the market and set out our requirements in terms of what was essential and what was desirable.

“The entire process took around six months, which is a long time, but we needed to get it right. After numerous demonstrations from several providers to different groups of people in the company, we decided that SOS Connect was the best all-round solution in terms of enabling us to fully manage our cases, financials and our data.

“We are looking to grow in the future and one of the attractions of SOS Connect is that it can assist us in that process.”

Jane Chanot, chairman of the Family Law Company, added: “I am very excited to be working with SOS to implement such an innovative and efficient case management system.”

David McNamara, managing director at SOS, said: “As well as full practice law firms, SOS Connect is ideal for specialists and The Family Law Company is a great example of the type of new, ambitious niche law firms which are signing up.”



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