Excellent legal apprenticeship opportunities for school and college leavers with specialist property law firm, Conveyancing Direct

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30 June 2016


Damar200The specialist property law firm, Conveyancing Direct is offering opportunities for young people to start a legal apprenticeship.

Conveyancing Direct, based in St Leonards-on-Sea in Hastings, provides specialist residential property conveyancing services across the UK.

In partnership with award-winning legal apprenticeship provider, Damar Training, the firm is offering the chance for eight young people to embark on a career in the legal profession.

On successful completion, the apprentices will gain a nationally recognised qualification, experience and the opportunity to progress their legal career to become a licensed conveyancer.

The firm is inviting applications from young people interested in the legal sector and who would prefer to work and study at the same time, gaining valuable experience in the job role, rather than bear the cost of university.  Alongside their day-to-day work, the apprentice will receive professional training.

Michelle Timms, Learning and Development Manager at Conveyancing Direct said: “These are very exciting opportunities and ones that have never been available before. The apprenticeship opportunities offer the chance to develop skills, gain qualifications and start a legal career, all whilst earning a salary”.

Prospective apprentices can find out more about these exciting opportunities by visiting the government’s official apprenticeship website here. Alternatively, they can contact Maria Grimsley on 0161 480 8171 or email Maria.Grimsley@damartraining.com to register their interest.



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