ETSOS on the case with Cognito

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29 April 2013


Search supermarket ETSOS has announced that its online ordering portal has now been fully integrated into Cognito Software’s FiLOS case management system. This will allow Cognito FiLOS users to order and review searches direct from their workflow, avoiding the need to switch between applications.

Commenting on the move, Steve Chivers, Cognito’s director of sales & marketing, said: “ In speaking with ETSOS it was clear that we had a common philosophy in wanting technology that actually made our users’ lives easier. User feedback had highlighted the potential of accessing search ordering capability from within Cognito FiLOS itself, and ETSOS impressed with their willingness to work with us to make the integration happen.

It’s added a whole new layer of efficiency and time-saving as well as giving our law firm clients complete oversight of the market, which is a key compliance requirement. The development has also shown our commitment to continuous improvement and is bringing ETSOS many more platform users so this really is a win-win situation for everybody.”

Phil Natusch, managing director of ETSOS, added “ We’re seeing a real trend amongst case management providers to give their users access to specialist third party products to help them deliver their services more efficiently and cost-effectively. We have a steady stream of integration work thanks to the broad appeal of the ETSOS concept – a brand and provider agnostic ‘search supermarket’ where you can get everything you need in the way of searches, risk reports and title insurance under one roof.”



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