Eclipse Legal Systems first with ReviewSolicitors integration

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13 July 2015


Eclipse200Eclipse Legal Systems, the sole law society-endorsed legal software provider, has announced integration with new-to-market ReviewSolicitors.

Founded by trio Saleem Arif (co-founder of QualitySolicitors), Michael Hanney and Pete Storey, ReviewSolicitors is a review site exclusively for the legal profession. It uniquely enables law firms to capture client feedback and display it upon an unbiased online platform.

The integration between ReviewSolicitors and Eclipse’s market-leading proclaim case and practice management solution will allow law firms to automatically email clients at the end of their transaction, requesting a review be left at www.reviewsolicitors.co.uk. This automated feedback capture process will enable law firms to refine their service offerings and provide invaluable information to assist new clients seeking legal advice.

Darren Gower, marketing director at Eclipse, comments:

“This integration with ReviewSolicitors will enable Proclaim users to harness the latest review technology platform, capturing vital satisfaction data in a way that is a seamless part of their client and matter management process.”

Saleem Arif of ReviewSolicitors adds:

“In the past, review sites in the legal profession have attracted two types of review: either from those who are extremely satisfied with their service, or those that have had a bad experience. This integration will help to provide a fuller and more representative sample of overall client satisfaction, not just the extremes. This adds a new level of integrity, helping clients to make an informed decision.”



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