Eclipse Legal Systems expands international presence with Zambia win

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20 June 2013


Leading legal software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has announced its latest international client with the win of Zambia-based Folotiya and Chiumya Legal Practitioners.  This latest win adds a further international territory to Eclipse’s portfolio which also includes (outside of the UK), Latvia, Switzerland, Australia and Nigeria.

Folotiya and Chiumya was among the very first niche legal practices to open in Zambia, focusing solely on corporate and commercial law.  Prior to founding the firm with her partner, Natasha Chiumya was an instrumental part of PricewaterhouseCooper’s (PwC) corporate recovery team and has extensive experience in private sector development.

The practice majors in advising on banking and financial transactions, liquidations and receiverships, attending to corporate acquisitions, and managing property transactions of medium- and large-scale developments.

Folotiya and Chiumya is implementing Eclipse’s Proclaim system throughout the firm as its core .  A conveyancing workflow is also being taken, with consultancy work provided by Eclipse to tailor that system specifically for use in the African territory.  In addition, the firm is taking Eclipse’s FileView solution to provide real-time, transparent online access to matter information.

Natasha Chiumya of the practice comments:

“As a niche practitioner we were looking for a solution that would provide us with both internal efficiencies and external competitive differentiation.  Proclaim provides that fit for us, and will be invaluable as we grow our presence and our brand.”



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