Eclipse and the Land Registry Business Gateway

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7 January 2014


The UK’s largest independently-owned legal software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has announced integration between its solution and the Land Registry’s Business Gateway (LRBG).

The Business Gateway allows conveyancers to access Land Registry services directly from their case management systems.  Services available include property enquiries, document copy requests, bankruptcy searches, transaction status reports, and so on.

Eclipse’s family of Proclaim Case Management solutions is the UK’s most widely-used, and the Conveyancing system is currently implemented at 150 organisations.  Integration with LRBG is due for launch in Q1 2014 and will enable users to seamlessly interact with the Gateway from the Proclaim desktop environment.  Utilising Web Services, Proclaim will provide 2-way integration for both data and documentation.

Tracy Blencowe, Business Solutions Director at Eclipse, comments:

“Proclaim is one of the most widely used Conveyancing solutions in the UK, with clients ranging from heavyweight volume organisations through to high-street practices and small boutique firms.  Reducing costs and trimming fat from property transactions is vital – margins for conveyancers are often thin, and clients expect a seamless and transparent service.

“By integrating Proclaim with the LRBG, our clients will have access to a solution that provides the ultimate in operational effectiveness – and the capability to further enhance their customers’ service experience.”



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