Eclipse celebrates summer success with over 30 new clients

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24 September 2015


Dolores

Dolores Evelyn, sales director at Eclipse

Law Society Endorsed legal software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has announced superb summer quarterly results.

The 3-month period from 1 June 2015 – 31 August 2015 saw a total of 32 new client signings including 4 six-figure deals. Ranging from established high street practices through to boutique operators and new start-ups, the firms implemented an array of Proclaim Case and Practice Management Software solutions. Among the wins were:

  • Full service law firm, Slater Heelis – utilising the Proclaim Practice Management Software solution across multiple areas of law
  • Thomson Snell & Passmore, Guinness World Record holder for the UK’s oldest law firm – implementing a ready-to-go Personal Injury Case Management system
  • Niche new start-up, Consilia Legal – utilising Proclaim Case Management Software with a bespoke Mediation solution

The continuing success of Eclipse and its Proclaim solution – now with over 23,000 users – can be attributed to the complete flexibility of the system. Available in a variety of flavours to suit firms’ needs, Proclaim has grown organically to become the most tailorable and complete solution available.

Eclipse’s sales director, Dolores Evelyn, comments:

“Our recent performance is evidence of the demand for flexible robust legal software and Eclipse’s reputation as the market leading supplier. Our broad range of clients and the diversity of their requirements mean Proclaim is often not seen as just a legal case management solution, but as an all-inclusive business management solution.”

 



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